Industry legislation

Manufacturing

Dangerous substances

Activities involving dangerous substances are regulated by the:

Activities include:

  • keeping
  • handling
  • transporting
  • conveyance
  • use and disposal
  • quality.

People and vehicles involved with dangerous substances must be licensed.

View dangerous substances licensing.

Site contamination

Site contamination can be an issue of significant concern. If it is not adequately recognised and addressed there may be a resulting risk to human health and the environment.

The Environment Protection (Site Contamination) Amendment Act 2007 gives the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) powers to deal with site contamination.

The EPA takes an advisory and guiding role, consistent with the National Environment Protection (Assessment of Site Contamination) Measure (NEPM) 1999.

Regulations pertaining to site contamination are covered in Part 5 of the Environment Protection Regulations 2009. These regulations support the Environment Protection (Site Contamination) Amendment Act 2007 with provisions for a site contamination audit system and the listing of potentially contaminating activities.

The schedules to the regulations also provide the templates for use by auditors, such as notifications by auditors to the EPA when commencing or terminating an audit.

View an outline of site contamination legislation and regulations on the EPA website.

Automotive

Australian Design Rules are national standards for vehicle safety and emissions. They are administered by the Australian Government under the Motor Vehicle Standards Act 1989.

View an outline of the Australian design rules on the website of the Australian Government's Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government.

Petroleum and geothermal

Rights to explore for and develop petroleum and other natural onshore resources in South Australia are managed under legislation:

The Act and Regulations also provide for:

  • security of title for petroleum rights
  • flexibility in the types of licences granted
  • protection of the environmental and public safety
  • public consultation processes to meet environmental objectives
  • ensuring the security of production and supply of natural gas
  • public reporting to provide stakeholders with information on industry performance and government decision-making
  • regulatory intervention and enforcement.

Offshore petroleum exploration and development are governed by:

Agriculture and food

Grains

Grains legislation comprises:

Find out more about Grains information and services

Livestock health certificates

Health certification may apply to stock entering South Australia. This includes the entry of stock into the Bovine Johne's Disease Protected Zone of SA.

Certification may apply to beef and dairy cattle, buffalo, alpacas, deer, pigs, sheep and goats, bees and bee products.

National Livestock Identification System

This system (the NLIS) provides a competitive advantage for Australian beef in export and domestic markets by improving cattle identification and traceability.

It also applies to sheep and goats.

Find out more about:

Poultry farms

The Development Regulations 2008 include poultry farms under the definition of 'intensive animal keeping'. Accordingly, poultry farms are a change of land use from general farming. This change of use requires planning approval from the relevant authority, which is generally the local council.

Food

A business selling food or providing food as part of a service is a food business for the purposes of the Food Act 2001. Food businesses are required to comply with the food safety requirements of the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code.

Find out more about food standards

Construction

National construction code

The national construction code of Australia (NCC) is an initiative of the Council of Australian Governments (COAG). It was developed to incorporate all on-site construction requirements into a single code.

The NCC comprises the Building Code of Australia (BCA), Volumes 1 and 2, and the Plumbing Code of Australia (PCA) as Volume 3.

View the NCC on the Australian Building Codes Board website

Building policy

Building work is a form of development. No development, including building work, can be undertaken in South Australia without an appropriate development approval.

In most cases the approving authority is the local council.

View a summary of the building policy in SA and an explanation of development applications.

The framework for development assessment and for building rules and standards in South Australia is provided by the Development Act 1993 and associated Development Regulations 2008.

Site contamination

Site contamination can be an issue of significant concern. If it is not adequately recognised and addressed there may be a resulting risk to human health and the environment.

The Environment Protection (Site Contamination) Amendment Act 2007 gives the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) powers to deal with site contamination. The EPA takes an advisory and guiding role, consistent with the

National Environment Protection (Assessment of Site Contamination) Measure (NEPM) 1999.

Regulations governing site contamination are covered in Part 5 of the Environment Protection Regulations 2009.

These regulations support theEnvironment Protection (Site Contamination) Amendment Act 2007 by providing for the site contamination audit system and the listing of potentially contaminating activities. The schedules to the regulations also provide templates for use by auditors. These include notifications by auditors to the EPA when commencing or terminating an audit. View an outline of the site contamination legislation and regulations and regulations on the EPA website.

Wine

Key pieces of legislation protecting and supporting South Australia's wine industry are:

View an outline of each of these wine industry Acts on the website of the Department of Primary Industries and Regions South Australia.

Minerals

In South Australia minerals are the property of the Crown.

Access to land for mineral exploration is gained through provisions of the:

Exploration and mining cannot be undertaken either on Crown or private land unless it is in accordance with the provisions of these Acts and regulations.

Depending on the nature and location of the tenement, approvals and consultation may be required under legislation covering environmental, planning and Aboriginal issues.


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Page last updated 3 September 2019

Provided by:
Department for Innovation and Skills
URL:
https://www.sa.gov.au/topics/business-and-trade/regulation/industry-legislation
Last Updated:
03/09/19
Printed on:
06/12/19
Copyright statement:
SA.GOV.AU is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Licence. © Copyright 2019
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