sa.gov.au

Climate change

Climate change is a change in the pattern of weather, and related changes in oceans, land surfaces and ice sheets, occurring over decades or longer.

While South Australia’s climate has always been highly variable, a strong warming trend has been observed since the 1970s. According to the latest data from the Bureau of Meteorology, average temperatures across the state have warmed almost one degree Celsius during the past century. Rainfall has also declined over most of the state since the 1970s, particularly for autumn and spring rainfall over the agricultural regions. In South Australia, we had our second-warmest year on record in 2014.

The Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR) plays a key role in helping South Australia prepare for climate change and is responsible for state-wide policy, the administration of climate change legislation and for the delivery of climate change programs.

Climate change initiatives in South Australia

In 2007, South Australia was the first Australian state to legislate a specific target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Working together, state government, local government, industry and the wider community have stabilised our greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels

In 2009, the Government of South Australia committed to a target of 33% of South Australia’s electricity generation to come from renewable energy by 2020. In late 2014, South Australia exceeded this target and now generates as much as 39% of its electricity from renewable energy. In 2014, the Government of South Australia set a new target of 50% renewable energy generation by 2025.


Related information

DEWNR provides further information on:


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Page last updated: 23 November 2015